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M.Å.Y.
 

08-674 78 03
monica.aberg-yngwe@chess.su.se

Monica Åberg Yngwe is a sociologist and has a PhD in public health science from Karolinska Institutet. The overall aim with her research project is to analyse the relation between income and health, both in different contexts and possible mechanisms such as relative and consensual definitions of deprivation. In January 2005 she defended her thesis with the title Resources and Relative Deprivation. Analysing mechanisms behind income, inequality and ill-health. She is currently working within the project “The Nordic Experience: Welfare States and Public Health (NEWS)” where the purpose is to focus on what role the Nordic welfare states has had for public health and health inequalities. This project has been initiated in a dialogue with the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. She is also currently working within a project on processes of relative deprivation and their consequences for poor health and health differentials financed by the Swedish Research Council.

Positions

  • 2005 - Postdoctoral researcher at CHESS
  • 2005 PhD in Public Health Sciences at Karolinska Institutet
  • 2002 – 2005 Doctoral student at CHESS
  • 1998 – 2002 Employed at Social Medicine, Stockholm County Council and doctoral student in Public Health Sciences

Research

The main interest concerns the relation between income and health. The ongoing project “Processes of relative deprivation and their consequences for poor health and health differentials” focus on the fact that the income and health relation does not only dependent on lack of material resources in an absolute sense. To a certain extent also other factors seem to play a significant role. Relative deprivation has been lifted forward as one possible explanation to why people at lower income levels have worse health. The basic idea with relative deprivation is that it is easier to live under bad conditions when more people share the same disadvantaged situation, but also that what can be regarded as bad conditions depend upon social comparison processes.

The project is financed by the Swedish Research Council and consists of three parts. The first part aims to analyse existing data using different ways of measuring relative deprivation. The second part includes collecting new data concerning social comparison and, following on this, analysing relative deprivation and its consequences on health. And finally, to be able to study if relative deprivation causes stress reactions in the third part of the project some experiments will be carried out.

The work within the project “The Nordic Experience: Welfare States and Public Health (NEWS)” focus on what role the Nordic welfare states have had for public health and health inequalities. This project has been initiated in a dialogue with the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. The project will draw on existing knowledge and new analyses from leading researchers in social policy and welfare state research as well as from public health, social epidemiology and health inequalities research.

Publications

Åberg Yngwe M, Fritzell J, Lundberg O, Diderichsen F, Burström B. (2003) “Exploring relative deprivation: is social comparison a mechanism in the relation between income and health?”. Social Science and Medicine 57:1463-1473.

Åberg Yngwe M, Fritzell J, Burström B, Lundberg O.(2005) ”Comparison or consumption? Distinguishing between different effects of income in the Nordic welfare states”. Social Science and Medicine 61:627-635.

Åberg Yngwe M, Lundberg O, Burström B. (2006) “On the importance of internalized consumption norms for ill health”. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 34:76-82.

Åberg Yngwe, M. and Lundberg, O. (2006) ”Assessing the contribution of relative deprivation to income differences in health”. In Fritzell, J. and Lundberg, O. (eds) Health Inequalities and Welfare Resources. Bristol: Policy Press, forthcoming.